Science & Research

Digital Archeology

Digital Archeology

Quartz, 2019, 9:02… The internet is not forever, it can break and disappear. Olia Lialina and Dragan Espenschied are part of a growing group of people who preserve and archive our online digital history. They see the web from the 90s and 2000s as an artifact, at times, even, Net Art.

Broscience & Fitness Advice

Broscience & Fitness Advice

Quartz, 2019, 8:04… Online fitness advice is notoriously bad. So why is it so popular? Exercise gurus and fitness influencers are all over social media with supplements and research claims. Broscience is in your feed telling you about fad diets and free weights — but how much is actually supported by science? Quartz News speaks with scientists, researchers, and fitness experts about the sources and research behind the proliferating stream of advice online.

How Visual Sociology Ended Child Labor

How Visual Sociology Ended Child Labor

Vox, 2019, 6:35… Child labor was widely practiced until a photographer showed the public what it looked like. The 1900 US Federal Census revealed that 1.75 million children under the age of 16, more than one in five, were gainfully employed. They worked all over the country in cotton mills, glass blowing factories, sardine canneries, farms, and even coal mines. In an effort to expose this exploitation of children, the National Child Labor Committee hired a photographer to travel around the country and investigate and report on the labor conditions of children.

Race, Ethnicity, and DNA

Race, Ethnicity, and DNA

Vox, 2019, 7:24… At-home DNA ancestry tests have become hugely popular in recent years. More than 26 million have taken one of these tests. If their marketing is to be believed, they can help you learn where your DNA comes from, and even where your ancestors lived. But the information that can be inferred from your DNA is actually much more limited than testing companies are letting on. And that has lead consumers to misinterpret their results — which is having negative consequences.

Beneficent Polluters

Beneficent Polluters

PBS Newshour, 2019, 9:51… UC Berkeley sociologist Arlie Hochschild traveled to Louisiana, the second-poorest state, to explore why its neediest populations simultaneously rely on federal aid and reject the concept of “big government.” As Paul Solman reports, the author and professor discovered many residents feel betrayed by their state's government for failing to protect them from toxic pollution that risks their health.

The Happiest Country In The World

The Happiest Country In The World

Vice News, 2019, 4:36… Finland has been declared the happiest country in the world for the second year in a row. On Wednesday, the United Nations released its annual World Happiness Report and confirmed the Nordic country as the reigning champion of joy. But in many ways, the land of frigid temperatures and dark winter days seems like the most unlikely of choices.

How AI Could Reinforce Biases In The Criminal Justice System

How AI Could Reinforce Biases In The Criminal Justice System

CNBC, 2019, 8:33… Increasingly, algorithms and machine learning are being implemented at various touch points throughout the criminal justice system, from deciding where to deploy police officers to aiding in bail and sentencing decisions. The question is, will this tech make the system more fair for minorities and low-income residents, or will it simply amplify our human biases?

Residential v Occupational Segregation Today

Residential v Occupational Segregation Today

Vox, 2019, 6:48… We work in diverse places. We live in segregated ones. America policies engineered our segregated homes. But the workplace? That had the chance of being a place where we interact with people of other races — and form meaningful relationships. These maps show that this hasn't exactly happened. In fact, the most personal parts of our lives is still very segregated.

Urban Thinkscapes

Urban Thinkscapes

Quartz, 2018, 5:03… Urban Thinkscape is more than just a playground. It was designed by a team of psychologists and architects to encourage families to play while waiting for the bus. The researchers behind the project argue that play is crucial for early childhood development and that there needs to be more of it built into public spaces — more than a playground for kids. In 2050, 70% of the world’s children will live in cities. If the team can prove Urban Thinkscape’s success, it’s a concept that can be replicated almost anywhere.

The Science Behind Implicit Bias Training

The Science Behind Implicit Bias Training

PBS NewsHour, 2018, 9:12… Against the backdrop of simmering tensions over race and police violence against African Americans, police departments like the NYPD have introduced a relatively new training program aimed at teaching officers about implicit bias. Special correspondent Charlayne Hunter-Gault reports on the research behind “Fair and Impartial Policing” and whether it’s really effective.

Social Settings as a Placebo

Social Settings as a Placebo

PBS NewsHour, 2018, 5:36... The placebo effect influences all types of healing, from yoga to laying of hands to remedies in your doctor's office. While researching his book, “Suggestible You”, on the science of belief, science writer Erik Vance visited healers in the U.S., China and Mexico. He has been blessed, cursed and tortured in countless ways. He joined ScienceScope to journey from Mexico to Maryland to show how these beliefs influence healing.

The (Bad) Science of Chocolate

The (Bad) Science of Chocolate

Vox, 5:39... Chocolate is good for your health, one study concludes. Another study indicates chocolate can be a useful aid to weight-loss. Senior moments? Chocolate may be the answer to your problems. These are just a few of the headlines about chocolate's effect on your health. However, the claims made about chocolate's glorious benefits need to be taken with a grain of salt.